Karlo I. J. Dizon, Esq.

Karlo I. J. Dizon, Esq.

Karlo I. J. Dizon, Esq., founded AsylumLegal.

He is a licensed attorney who has worked on pro bono immigration and asylum cases, as an assistant public defender, and in one of the country’s largest commercial litigation firms. He also researched and worked on appellate matters as part of the Stanford Law School Immigrants’ Rights Clinic.

Karlo received his law degree from Stanford Law School. He holds an M.Sc. with Honors in Comparative Politics from the London School of Economics and a B.A. with Honors in Political Science from Yale University.

AsylumLegal.AI Analysis: USCIS Increases Employment Authorization Document Validity Period for Certain Categories

The AsylumLegal.AI Analysis series aims to interpret news pieces in the context of asylum seekers, highlighting their potential implications. All copyright to the articles remain with the original owners. This USCIS update is relevant and important to asylum seekers because it discusses modifications to the Policy Manual regarding the maximum validity period for Employment Authorization Documents (EADs) for certain noncitizens. This policy change has implications for asylum seekers who are employment authorized incident to their status or circumstance, as well as applicants for asylum or withholding of removal. The Policy Manual now allows for EADs to have a maximum validity...

AsylumLegal.AI Analysis: The Biden administration is expected to keep cap on refugees admitted to the US at 125,000

The AsylumLegal.AI Analysis series aims to interpret news pieces in the context of asylum seekers, highlighting their potential implications. All copyright to the articles remain with the original owners. ABC News reports the decision of the Biden administration to maintain the cap on refugees admitted to the United States at 125,000 for the next fiscal year. This decision has implications for asylum seekers as it reflects the administration's commitment to protecting vulnerable refugees. One important aspect to note is that the cap on refugee admissions does not necessarily mean that the U.S. will admit the full number of refugees allowed....

AsylumLegal.AI Bytes: Affirmative Asylum Applicants Must Provide Interpreters Starting Sept. 13 | USCIS

The AsylumLegal.AI Bytes series aims to make pivotal legal articles accessible to a wider public. All copyright to the articles remain with the original owners.Starting from September 13, 2023, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) requires affirmative asylum applicants who are not fluent in English or wish to proceed with their interview in a language other than English to bring their own interpreter. The only exception to this requirement is for sign language interpreters, as USCIS will continue to provide them as a disability accommodation. If you need a sign language interpreter, follow the instructions on your interview notice...

Bytes from REFUGEE ROULETTE: DISPARITIES IN ASYLUM ADJUDICATION (Stanford Law Review, 2007)

EDITORIAL. When it comes to asylum cases, where the stakes are literally life and death, the judicial system often appears to fall far short of the ideal. As this pivotal study reveals, arbitrary factors like the identity of a particular asylum officer or immigration judge have an alarming influence on whether asylum seekers begging for refuge are granted protection or deported back into harm's way. In "Refugee Roulette: Disparities in Asylum Adjudication," Professors Jaya Ramji-Nogales, Andrew Schoenholtz, and Philip Schrag analyze vast databases of decisions spanning 1999-2005. Their findings expose a broken system. Grant rates for asylum applicants from the...

DNA Collection at U.S. Borders: Scrutinizing Practices and Privacy Concerns

On May 24, 2023, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) published an extensive analysis of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) DNA collection program. The CBP, a subsidiary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), initiated this program in 2020, following the Department of Justice's decision to lift a decade-long exemption. This GAO report stresses the need for precise data collection to improve the program's oversight and effectiveness. DNA Collection Practices at the Border Asylum-seekers at the U.S. border are often required to provide DNA samples, a practice that has grown increasingly common since 2019. This has seen a...

Understanding Title 42 and Asylum Processing at the Southern Border

Title 42 refers to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) order that permits the barring of entry and expulsion of asylum-seekers at the southern border if there is a "serious danger of the introduction of disease into the United States." In place since March 20, 2020, Title 42 has complicated the asylum process and created inconsistencies in its application. Title 42 applies to asylum-seekers through two main mechanisms: "turn-backs" before they have touched U.S. soil and "expulsions" after they have touched U.S. soil. While these mechanisms officially apply to anyone seeking asylum, discrepancies in Title 42's application exist...

How to apply for defensive asylum

You can apply for defensive asylum if you are in removal or deportation proceedings. During those proceedings, would claim asylum as a defense to being removed from the United States. Removal proceedings occur in Immigration Court before an Immigration Judge. Those courts and judges are part of the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), which is a part of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). Step 1: Attend the Master Calendar hearing These steps summarize what you can expect to happen during the Master Calendar hearing. Generally, the Master Calendar hearing will be your first hearing in Immigration Court. At...

How to apply for affirmative asylum

If you are currently in the U.S. and you are not in deportation proceedings, the seven steps below summarize how you can apply for affirmative asylum. Step 1: Verify you have been physically in the U.S. You must be physically present in the U.S. to apply for asylum. Before applying, gather the evidence that can prove your presence. Step 2: File Form I-589, and wait for your 2 notices a. Make sure you are not barred from applying for asylum. b. File Form 1-589, within one year of your last arrival in the U.S. (unless you meet an exception to...

How can applying for affirmative asylum prevent “unlawful presence” in the United States?

Being granted asylum means being able to permanently escape persecution by lawfully living in the United States. It also means the chance to find a path to U.S. citizenship. But even before you are granted asylum, applying for affirmative asylum can also prevent you from being considered unlawfully present in the U.S. Note that this only applies to applications for affirmative asylum—that is, applying for asylum if you are already physically present in the United States, and not currently in removal proceedings. What does it mean to have “unlawful presence” in the United States? Generally, if you (1) entered the...

What is derivative asylum?

  What is derivative asylum for children of refugees and asylees? If you were admitted to the United States as a principal refugee or if you were granted asylum in the United States in the last two years, you may be able to petition for your children to receive refugee or asylee status by filing a Form I-730, Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition on their behalf. This is known as derivative refugee or asylee status, because your children will be deriving this status from you after you were admitted to the United States as a refugee or received a grant of asylum....

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